Despite Bleak Jobs Growth, Managers Must Prepare for the Next Jobs Boom

Linda Dulye's picture
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The U.S. May 2011 employment figures released last week demonstrate how stubborn, to put it nicely, this economic recovery has been. Unemployment

Managers are witnessing the effects on their bare-bones staff, stretched thin and often performing the duties of two or three people.

While these workers no doubt are thankful to have a job in today's brutal environment, chances are they're looking ahead to when the job market loosens and the lure of a new job is more than wishful thinking.

Results of a recent Employment Confidence Survey by Glassdoor.com show that employees are optimistic about their future employment opportunities:

While nearly three-fourths (73 percent) of employees expect to leave their job for a new employer in the future, 38 percent expect to leave their job in less than three years, 28 percent expect to do so in less than two years and one in seven (14 percent) expect to do so in less than one year. More than half of younger workers 18-34 (56 percent), single employees (56 percent) and those who have been in their current jobs less than three years (57 percent) expect to find a new job at another employer within 36 months.

Let's face it. You have members of your team that are biding their time until the economy rebounds and they can find another job. They're sticking around because other opportunities are few and far between -- at best.

Are they going to tell you that? Probably not. That's why leaders need to prepare now for retaining top talent in your organization.

In many ways, the differential will come down to the fundamentals of effectively managing people: two-way communication, trust, recognition and skills building.

Dulye & Co.'s Spectator-Free Workplace™ (SFW) newsletter tackles these management basics and supplies no-frills techniques for effective communications and collaboration. Let us know topics of importance to you as your organization readies for the economic recovery and a more robust job market.

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