Linda Dulye Featured Keynote Speaker at Public Relations Society of America

Earlier this year, President and Founder, Linda Dulye, participated at the PRSA Connect 14 Conference in Chicago, May 20-21, 2014, as a featured key note speaker. This was her first time presenting on a PRSA platform on, "7 Success Tips for Helping Managers Communicate and Connect." 

Research by consulting trailblazer Dulye & Co. identifies managers as the ultimate magnet for employee engagement in organizations large and small. The interaction between a manager and his or her team members has a profound impact on morale and productivity.

Linda Dulye provided a winning game plan to help Communication professionals bring out the best in managers in their workplace.

Drawing from her firm’s heralded Spectator-Free Workplace™ Training Program, Linda revealed proven, practical, portable tools that will enable and equip managers to motivate and engage employees, and earn the respect of others.

Linda’s toolkit of 7 success tips featured interactive exercises, relevant case studies and simple models for coaching managers to sharpen their communication skills and facilitate great teamwork.

Attendees learned concrete approaches for raising the bar on talent and teamwork by helping managers to:

  • Understand their role of key communicator
  • Activate direct feedback using two-way communication practices
  • Give substance, not sugar coating, to even the toughest messages
  • Unlock employees’ ideas with questions that demonstrate interest
  • Recognize others in low-cost, high-impact ways
  • Measure effectiveness without complex employee surveys
  • Demonstrate accountability through actions that build credibility and inspire others.

To learn more about Linda Dulye’s speaking topics and how to book her for your company or conference event, please contact Bev Pierce at Dulye & Co., bpierce@dulye.com or 708-788-6204. 

3 STEPS TO REVERSING A TURNOVER TREND

By: Ashley Devick | Feb. 26, 2014 | NFIB.com
Featuring: Linda Dulye, Founder, Dulye & Co.

Employee turnover can be beneficial when it means new hires are bringing fresh ideas to a small business. But when a business resembles a revolving door and turnover becomes an epidemic, it’s downright scary—and expensive.

The cost factors are numerous, from lost productivity to reduced efficiency from the spread-thin workforce that remains at the organization.

“Managing turnover and really managing your talent—and especially your best employees—is something that any employer, including small business, can take proactive actions on,” says Linda Dulye, the founder and president of Dulye & Co., a workplace engagement consultancy in New York.

1. Speak up.

According to Dulye, lack of communication, particularly with a direct manager, and involvement in decision-making are major factors that drive an employee’s decision to leave. Workers tend to feel a sense of loyalty to a business if they feel informed about its performance and involved in daily operations. Increasing the number of cross-team conversations, brainstorming sessions and regular meetings about the performance of the company can help make people feel a part of the team.

2. Learn from those who are leaving.

If poor communication isn’t the problem, small business owners must figure out why people are leaving. “You really need to uncover some root causes,” Dulye says.

Frightened of burning a bridge, exiting employees may feel uncomfortable being fully honest with the small business owner. Instead, Dulye suggests small business owners have trusted employees conduct exit interviews and relay the information to you.

Or, bring in a human resources consultant to conduct the interviews and have that person follow up with people who have already left. It allows for more honest answers.

3. Hire the right people.

If a company is facing a high turnover rate, it could be the result of poor hiring practices. To find the right employees, Claudia St. John of Affinity HR Group in Cazenovia, N.Y., suggests adding behavioral interviews to your hiring process.

For example, if exit interviews reveal employees are leaving because of the high-stress nature of the available position, behavioral questions such as “Describe a time on any job in which you were faced with stresses which tested your coping skills. What did you do?” can give clues to how a candidate will respond.   

Staff Turnover: 4 Tips to Ready You for a NEW Reality of the 2014 Workplace

How ready are you to address or possibly avert the challenge of staff turnover? Four tips to help you lead and learn.

Opportunity Tops Gift List for Your Best Employees

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By Linda Dulye, president & founder, Dulye & Co.
December 17, 2013

What’s the best gift for your top talent?

No, it’s not a hefty gift card or Super Bowl tickets.

The gift of a challenge goes farther than anything you can tie with a bow. A new, on-the-job opportunity, that stretches the thinking and actions of a staff member, sends a clear message from you of trust, confidence and true caring.

You Don't Need a BIG Holiday Party to Show Appreciation

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Planning an office holiday party? Here are 5 practical tips for holiday merrymaking with meaning—that won't break the company budget!

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A Business Lesson From the Debt Deal

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There really is a silver lining in the behavior on Capitol Hill over the past few weeks. The crackling debates, snarly standoffs and prickly posturing of political leaders serve as clear evidence that 11th-hour planning stinks.

There’s no reason to fall in that trap with your department as 2014 looms large. Now is the time to get your strategic game plan moving, without alienating or annoying anyone.  

My PAPA model keeps you and your team engaged during the process. Follow these four steps and avoid the kind of spectacle that one senator called “an agonizing odyssey.”

Here’s what to do:

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Five Ways to Maximize Your Investment in Interns

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By Linda Dulye, President & Founder, Dulye & Co.
Published in Fox Business | Sept. 30, 2013
 
Whether your company has 
1 or 100 interns, Dulye & Co.
can help you maximize your investment in young talent today and for your future success.

Lately there has been lots of chatter about internships sparked by a growing movement to challenge the ‘no pay’ status that accompanies so many of them. Interns at the White House raised their opposition to unpaid internships. So did former interns at the Hearst Corporation, NBCUniversal and other corporate biggies.

Pay or no pay—the true value of many internships in non-profit, government, public and private sectors is being wasted.

The investment is being drained largely by how most internship programs are structured—as a one-way learning process.

Maximize your internship program with these five tips.

Can Executives Be Coached?

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Those at the top of organizations are data focused. They ravenously devour daily operational performance stats about sales, orders, overhead costs, inventory, compensation, sick days, and so on. Ironically, data can also help save business leaders from themselves. 

Linda Dulye offers five big tips in her latest Fox Business column that will help you take the edge off your top leaders and help them connect with the workforce.

Tips For Coaching Your CEO

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Can your CEO be coached?

Dulye & Co. President Linda Dulye gives tips in this interview with Michigan radio newsman Michael Cohen of 1320 WILS.

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AOL's Armstrong: Boss or Workplace Bully?

It didn’t quite seem possible, but, there it was, within a matter of mind-numbing seconds, AOL Chairman and CEO Tim Armstrong went from chief rally man to insufferable bully.

Caught on tape on Monday while speaking to 1,000 AOL employees, Armstrong verbally admonished one of the staffers for photographing the company meeting—and then, fired him on the spot.

 “Abel, put that camera down right now,” ordered Armstrong. Followed instantly by, “Abel. You’re fired!  Out!”

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